Robyn Rock

Creative Director / Artist

{Art & Architecture • Botanics • Black Culture}

 

Work//

    Totems

        T1 | Past | Present | Future
        T1A | Cactus Flower              
        T1B | Modern Marvel
        T2 | An Ode to the Kamoinge Workshop


    Tapestries

        Black Ecology
        USA 2020
        Black on Both Sides

    Stories
       On Nature: A Reflection
       
    Creative Direction
        Juno House
        Urban Garden

    Collection
        Black Artchive

About
Contact

Mark

T1
Past | Present | Future



T1 - Past | Present | Future
(2018-2021)


12 pieces (assorted sizes)

T1 is an assemblage of ceramic vessels organized in a free standing totem position. Comprised of 12 pieces the totem can be reassembled and the pieces can be used individually. Each piece was individually conceived and designed as either a vase or planter for individual use.

The collection spans the artist earliest planters from 2018 to her most recent studio pieces in 2020. the assemblage is a reflection of the artists trajectory from creating one off pieces to larger sculptural forms. The artists exploration of color, texture, and form in her individual pieces inform the whole of the totem.


Mark

T2
An Ode to the Kamoinge Workshop




T2 - An Ode to the Kamoinge Workshop (2021)
8 pieces (4-3x3x3 / 4 3x3x6)

T2 is an assemblage of ceramic modular pieces. Designed as 8 pieces but to be assembled as whole. Each piece can act as a vessel for plants or florals. The holes and circle cut outs are designed to showcase the selected plant clipings.
The collection is an ode to the photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop,  a collective of Black photographers established in New York City in 1963. This totem works similiarly, each piece unique but cordinated to support and work as a whole.  





Mark

T2 (Working Together: An Ode to the Kamoinge Workshop)




T3 (2021)

T2 is an assemblage of ceramic modular pieces. Designed as 8 pieces but to be assembled as whole. Each piece can act as a vessel for plants or florals. The holes and circle cut outs are designed to showcase the selected plant clipings. 
10 pieces


The collection is an ode to the photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop,  a collective of Black photographers established in New York City in 1963. This totem works similiarly, each piece unique but cordinated to support and work as a whole. 
Constructed: 65 inches

The assemblage includes no exterior support, and the totem is free standing. Each piece is usable and functions as a vessel. Each piece has a character and together they create a community of visual variety. Ideally this piece can live in or outdoors in the tall stack or smalller stacks.




T02aT02dT02g
T02bT02e
T02h
T02cT02f


Mark

USA 2020




USA 2020 (2021)
11 x18.5”

A visual representation of the 2020 American landscape. While 84 million Americans voted Biden as the 46th president, an astonding 71 million Americans voted to re-elect Trump. The checkered black and while pattern struggles to find balance, the push and pull, reminscent of the pull for power between Republicans and Democrats. All while surround by the green landscape, representative of climate change waits patiently for the internal struggle to give way so that we can fight the damage we are so actively causing. 


References / Influences


Marcus Garvey, Pan African/ Black Liberation Flag (1920)
Dave Hammons, African American Flag (1990)
Dave Hammons, African American Flag (1990)


Mark

Black Ecology 



Black Ecology (2021)

20x25”

The flag represents the Black Ecological Struggle. The central focal point is that of the black square at the center, surrounded by white squares(society) then surrounded by black squares (black society) and eventually surrounded and grounded by the green background (nature). Inspired by The Womanist Reader Black Ecology Futures communal study program.  



References/Influences




Marcus Garvey, Pan African/ Black Liberation Flag (1920)



Mark

Juno House




JUNO HOUSE
Barcelona, Spain
Juno House is a modern meeting point, being built to meet the demands of a post-pandemic society, where sustainability and avant-garde design go hand in hand, and where digital and physical encounters are fluid.









Urban Garden Zine
Collage Series, combination of personal photos and botanical drawings


Black Artchive



Black Artchive  @blackartchive
Est. 2018

Black Womxn : Exploring Visual + Literary representation

A collection of images that center the Black womxn, shared with excerpts from the artists. This project is an ongoing effort to highlight the representation of Black Womxn in contemporary art.  In 2019-, the commitment to reading only Black womxn authors was also combined with this project.



Essential Reading by
Black Women Authors 
Reading List

Grand Union / Zadie Smith
Sula / Toni Morrison  
We Should All Be Feminists /Chimamanda Ngozi

The Color Purple/Alice Walker
Seen It All and Done the Rest /Pearl Cleage
Citizen/Claudia Rankine
Eloquent Rage /Brittany Cooper
My Sister the Serial Killer/Oyinkan Braithwaite
The Color Purple/Toni Morrison
Things I Should Have Told My Daughter/Pearl Cleage
Their Eyes We’re Watching God/Zora Neale Hurston
Another Brooklyn/Jacqueline Woodson
How to Love a Jamaican/Alexia Arthurs
Bone Black/bell hooks
Thick/Tressie McMillan Cottom
Whatever Happened to An Interracial Love/Kathleeen Collins
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings/Maya Angelou
Beloved
Magical Negro/Morgan Parker
The World According to Fannie Davi/Bridgett M. Davis
Black is the Body/Emily Bernard
Electric Arche/Eve L. Ewing
This Will be My Undoing/Morgan Jerkins
Heads of the Colored People/Nafisa Thompson-Spires
Bad Feminist/Roxane Gay
Well Red Black Girl Anthology/Glory Edim
American Marriage/Tayari Jones
Red at the Bone/Jacqueline Woodson
The Mothers/Brit Bennett
What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sk/Lesley Nneka Arimah


 _ Negro Sunshine



                 “There is no one way to be black. Blackness is not a monolith and you are not someone who is lost in the abiss of uniformity. Blackness is a kelidoscope where, if you look closely, you will see many colorful patterns within the many reflections in the mirror. There is no one way to be black.”
(Morgan Jerkins)

                A rock is a perfect metaphor, an allegory in volume. When placed it’s sculptural limits beget a kind of artistic proposition — and when considered with reduced anthropomorphism and ungeologically — produce a ready-made analog to the causation and bounds of our attempts at the understanding of all things.

~
Chicago Raised, Brooklyn Aged
~
Library, Garden and Art Museum Enthusiast, Plant Mom + Cinepile

b. 1986, Omaha, Nebraska
︎Lives in Brooklyn. 


personal
BLACK ECOLOGY EXPLORATION Objectives:
1 Black Liberation 
2 Land Acknowledgement
3 Ecological Freedom
4 Build Strong Natural Connections 




Guidelines

  1. Black Liberation Matters.
  2. Nature is your only ally.
  3. Go Outside.
  4. Be You.
  1. What you give your attention grows.
  2. Change is the only constant.
  3. Drink more water. 
  4. Mental  > Material Liberation.


Objective Breakdown

1 Black Liberation
   Freedom to move freely in society, with protection and equal justice.
   Offer reparations for African Americans decendents of slavery.  
2 Land Acknowledgement
   Honor, acknowledge and compensate indigenous communities.   
3 Ecological Freedom
   Fair access to natural resources, property and land development.
4 Build Strong Natural Connections
   Encourage and strengthen individual connections to nature. 


— Contact


︎ Linkedin

︎ Aloha@robynrock.com




BLACK ECOLOGICAL EXPLORATION Objectives:

1 Black Liberation 
2 Land Acknowledgement
3 Ecological Freedom
4 Build Strong Natural Connections 



︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎

Guidelines

  1. Black Liberation Matters.
  2. Nature is the ultimate ally.
  3. Go Outside.
  4. Be You.
  1. What you give your attention grows.
  2. Change is the only constant.
  3. Drink more water. 
  4. Mental  > Material Liberation.

 ︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎︎

Objective Breakdown

1 Black Liberation
   Freedom to move freely in society, with protection and equal justice. 
2 Land Acknowledgement
   Honor, acknowledge and compensate indigenous communities.    
   Offer reparations for African Americans decendents of slavery.
3 Ecological Freedom
   Fair access to natural resources, property and land developement.
4 Build Strong Natural Connections
   Encourage and strength individual connections to the natural environment.